Category Archives: Brain

What prevents people from celebrating World Creativity and Innovation Day, April 21?

Even though the WCID April 21 celebration is relatively new, it’s growing, and people are learning about it now that it is a United Nations Day of Observance.

Do you think that feeling self-conscious may prevent people from celebrating their capacity to generate new ideas, make new decisions, take new actions and achieve new outcomes to make the world a better place and make their place in the world better too?
Think about it.

When it comes to creativity, many say they want to make sure they get it ‘right’ as if there is an external measure to meet, as if there is a perfection standard they must attain. There isn’t. Not where creativity is involved.*

Creativity is a natural process that results from a restlessness to change or improve the status quo. (Segal, 2001). We all feel that restlessness from time to time. We engage in new and different activities, use new patterns of thinking, perceive with new eyes, and/or seek new experiences. We might structure things differently, relate to others in new ways as a result.  Examples:  rearrange furniture; modify a recipe; take a new route to school; eat breakfast for dinner; hold meetings in a different location; invite unusual suspects to participate in the planning process.

Margaret Mead

Each these could be considered creative.  American Anthropologist Margaret Mead said, “In as much as someone has done something new for himself, he can be considered to have committed a creative act.” To which I like to add – whether other people consider it creative or not.

Backward Clock

Moving forward There’s no turning back the clock. We moved forward. We are creating the future with today’s resources and ideas. The World Economic Forum predicts creativity to be one of the top three skills employees will need by 2020. Yes, we moved on.

Creativity is one of our resources. By celebrating it every year April 21 and during the week leading up to it beginning on Leonardo da Vinci’s birthday, April 15 we prepare for the future.

Thought catalysts For your WCID this year, and for every year moving forward consider these thought catalysts

  • What is in your environment that can do with some improving?
    Improve it.
  • What ordinary activity might you make more fun?
    Make it more fun.
  • What efficiencies might you bring to a process? Bring them.

New ideas need a soft place to land. Remember there is balance in the universe.  Every idea influences a reaction. Giving new ideas a soft place to land will be the focus of a future blog post.

Confusion about creativity The term creative can be confusing. Insert the term before each of the following as an example:  economies, industries, advertising, agencies, media, digital, technology, sports plays, arts, commons, market, writing, images, resumes, ideas, photography, dance, quotes. In each instance, there’s a slightly different meaning.

A practical approach  For our purposes, to enable everyone to celebrate WCID and WCIW here’s the understanding used:  Generating new ideas, making new decisions, taking new actions and achieving new outcomes that make the world a better place and make your place in the world better too.

Remember to upload your WCID2018 and WCIW2018 actions to share with the world.


Segal, Marci (2001) Creativity and Personality Type: Tools for understanding and inspiring the many voices of creativity. Huntington Beach: Telos Publications.

To boost your creativity, procrastinate

If you quickly scan the two pictures by Octavio Ocampo, you’ll miss the detail and richness.  Spend a minute – what do you see in the pictures?

Forever Always by Octavio Ocampo

Visions of Quixote by Octavio Ocampo

If you quickly observe this sketch, you may assume it’s something less than it is.
First ideas are usually the most conventional; creative insight needs time to gestate.

“People who take time to step back and assess each visual puzzle above are more likely to perceive the multiple layers in the images. In the same way, when we’re developing an original idea, a pause gives our brains time to form creative associations, and recognize patterns, or simply see things from a different angle,” psychologist Maria Konnikova.

Let’s leverage procrastination for next year’s World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15-21. Why not start to consider ways to leverage/celebrate/engage during the week now?
Source: To boost your creativity, procrastinate

Creative people’s brains really do work differently

What makes highly creative people different from the rest of us? In the 1960s, psychologist and creativity researcher Frank X. Barron set about finding out. Barron conducted a series of experiments on some of his generation’s most renowned thinkers in an attempt to isolate the unique spark of creative genius. In a historic study, Barron…

“The study showed that creativity is informed by a whole host of intellectual, emotional, motivational and moral characteristics.
The common traits that people across all creative fields seemed to have in common were:

  • an openness to one’s inner life
  • a preference for complexity and ambiguity
  • an unusually high tolerance for disorder and disarray
  • the ability to extract order from chaos
  • independence; unconventionality
  • a willingness to take risks.”

Sourced from: qz.com

Emotional expression affects the brain's creativity network

The workings of neural circuits associated with creativity are significantly altered when artists are actively attempting to express emotions, according to a new brain-scanning study of jazz pianists.

Sourced through Scoop.it from: medicalxpress.com
“The bottom line is that emotion matters,” said senior author Charles Limb, MD. “It can’t just be a binary situation in which your brain is one way when you’re being creative and another way when you’re not. Instead, there are greater and lesser degrees of creative states, and different versions. And emotion plays a crucially important role in these differences.”

Using Pictionary to Study Creativity and the Brain

Researchers at Stanford are trying to see what parts of the brain underlie creativity.

Investigators at Stanford University have found a surprising link between creative problem-solving and heightened activity in the cerebellum, a structure located in the back of the brain and more typically thought of as the body’s movement-coordination center.
In designing the study, the researchers drew inspiration from the game Pictionary.
A new study is the first to directly implicate the cerebellum in the creative process. As for the brain’s higher-level executive-control centers? Not so much.
We found that activation of the brain’s executive-control centers — the parts of the brain that enable you to plan, organize and manage your activities — is negatively associated with creative task performance,” said Reiss, who holds the Howard C. Robbins Professorship in Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences.
Creativity is an incredibly valued human attribute in every single human endeavor, be it work or play,” he continued. “In art, science and business, creativity is the engine that drives progress. As a practicing psychiatrist, I even see its importance to interpersonal relationships. People who can think creatively and flexibly frequently have the best outcomes.”
http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2015/05/researchers-tie-unexpected-brain-structures-to-creativity.html

8 Subconscious Mistakes Our Brains Make Every Day–And How To Avoid Them

See on Scoop.itCreativity and Learning Insights

The swimmers body illusion and other ways our brains play tricks on us.

Marci Segal, MS‘s insight:

Fascinating insights encourage people to be open to question their beliefs.  Helpful especially now that what we were taught when we were young doesn’t necessarily hold true today.

 

Creativity is about new ideas, new decisions and new actions; by stretching beyond what we believe to be true, new doors open.

See on www.fastcompany.com

Brain Science Gives Us Evidence That Effort — Not IQ Or ZIP Code — Paves The Path To Success

See on Scoop.itCreativity and Learning Insights

As it turns out, we are not “set in stone” at birth — not by genetics, not by the luck-of-the-draw of our ZIP code.

Marci Segal, MS‘s insight:

Neuroscience: The more that teachers believe in their students the more that students believe in themselves. Think it’s the same for employers and employees?

See on www.huffingtonpost.com