Category Archives: United Nations

The Story of How World Creativity and Innovation Day became a UN Day of Observance in video

Greetings all,

Happy to share this video with you – it’s the 15-minute Ted-like speech I gave in Buffalo this past fall at the Creativity Expert Exchange in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the International Center for Studies in Creativity, my alma mater.

The founding of WCID is shared, as is the tale of how the day became a United Nations Day of Observance and why that is important. Spoiler alert: it’s centered on using creativity in problem-solving especially with regard to meeting the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals. Imagine applying creative thinking and creative evaluation to assess and address the challenges  – to find solutions that work.

How World Creativity and Innovation Day, April 21 became a UN International Day of Observance from Marci Segal on Vimeo.

Now scroll further for information on the Global Goals Interconnectedness and see what you can do to help meet any of the goals by reviewing the Global Goals List that follows.

With thanks to Nicolette Wever

The Global Goals are Interconnected

The goals’ interconnectedness and influences are spelled out in a paper Water, Peace and Global Security: Canada’s Place in a Changing World, delivered by R.W. Sandford, EPCOR Chair, Water and Climate Security, United Nations University, Institute for Water, Environment & Health at the University of Victoria, British Columbia Jan 23, 2018.

See Global Goals list below*

“All 17 of the UN’s 2030 Transforming Our World global sustainable development goals can be achieved by realizing the link between water security, climate stability and human and planetary health.
Water security means clean water and sanitation for all. It also means managing water on a basin scale which means protecting aquatic ecosystems which improve life on land and life below water which leads to improvements in agriculture which will help end hunger; which also helps to end poverty.

Managing water in a manner that will help end hunger and poverty, however, cannot be achieved without industry innovation and infrastructure; but innovation and infrastructure development cannot come into existence without quality education which demands gender equity which in itself leads to reduced inequality.
Quality education, gender equity, and reduced inequality lead to economic growth. It is only through economic stability that we will be able to make a smooth transition to affordable and clean energy for all which is a critical step toward climate action. Climate action will help restore planetary health thereby contributing to better physical and mental health and well-being for all.

Improved human health and well-being allows an ever more crowded world to react more proactively and be more resilient to growing public health threats like epidemic outbreaks which, in tandem with climate action will reduce the specter of large-scale forced human migration. This, in itself, will lead to peace and justice and strong institutions. Such institutions are necessary to guide humanity toward responsible production and consumption. It is only through strong institutions, responsible production and consumption, clean water, sanitation and climate action can we have sustainable cities and communities.

Making and acting upon the link between water security, climate stability and human and planetary health will demand the creation of the new kinds of partnerships that are necessary if we are to achieve all 17 of these global goals simultaneously. The building of such partnerships will build trust which will contribute to state and military security globally.”

*Global Goals List

1. No Poverty

This goal, which seeks to eradicate extreme poverty by 2030. The UN defines extreme poverty as living on less than $1.50 a day. Perhaps most importantly, this goal includes measures to protect those who have had to leave their homes and countries as a result of conflict.

2. No Hunger
The UN seeks to both improve the access that the world’s poorest have to food, and the ways in which that food is produced.

3. Good Health and Well-being
This goal focuses on continuing to reduce child mortality, the health of mothers, and combating other diseases.

4. Quality Education
Improving worldwide access to education is a top priority. It calls for free education through high school, rather than limiting it to primary school only.

5. Gender Equality
This goal advocates for the elimination of violence and discrimination against women. It also calls on countries to improve women’s social and economic standing.

6. Clean Water and Sanitation
The UN reports that by 2050, at least one in four people is likely to live in a country affected by chronic or recurring shortages of fresh water. This goal aims to improve sanitation and hygiene practices, including access to fresh water, in developing nations by 2030.

7. Affordable and Clean Energy
This goal seeks to broaden both the development and use of renewable energies by 2030, the next deadline date for achieving these goals.

8. Decent Work and Economic Growth
The UN is interested in both the creation of new jobs, and the development of those jobs that are sustainable enough to lift employees out of poverty. According to UN estimates, “roughly 470 million jobs are needed globally for new entrants to the labor market between 2016 and 2030.”

9. Industry, Innovation, and Infrastructure
This goal focuses primarily on the building of roads, rail systems, and telecommunications networks in the developing world.

10. Reduce Inequalities
This goal aims at reducing the inequalities in income distribution among the most marginalized populations in the world, both within developed and developing nations. The UN estimates that “a significant majority of households in developing countries – more than 75 percent of the population – are living today in societies where income is more unequally distributed than it was in the 1990s.”

11. Sustainable Cities and Communities
With urban populations on the rise over the past decade, the world is on a hunt for ways to house, feed, and employ that burgeoning population. This goal seeks to tackle that problem by reducing the number of people who live in slums by 2030. It also aims to reduce the pollution output coming from those urban centers.

12. Responsible Consumption and Production
This goal, a continuation of Goal 6, seeks to improve the access that people in developing countries have to food and clean water, while at the same time improving how food is produced on a global scale. It also aims to address the global obesity crisis.

13. Climate Action
The UN’s Sustainable Development Goals looks at quickly and efficiently reducing greenhouse-gas emissions in both developed and developing nations.

14. “Life Below Water”
The UN is interested in sustainable fishing practices and protecting marine life. They estimate that nearly “40 percent of the world oceans are heavily affected by human activities, including pollution, depleted fisheries, and loss of coastal habitats.”

15. Life on Land
The UN is also interested in protecting creatures on land, with an emphasis on reducing deforestation and desertification.

16. “Peace, Justice, and Strong Institutions”
A goal that envisions fair and free elections, as well as governmental accountability at every level. The UN estimates that “corruption, bribery, theft, and tax evasion cost some US $1.26 trillion for developing countries per year.”

17. Partnerships For the Goals
In keeping with practices established with the 2000 Millennium Development Goals, the UN continues to envision a global framework of support to make sure that its goals are realized.
Adapted from: https://www.csmonitor.com/World/Global-News/2015/0926/UN-s-17-global-goals-What-s-on-the-list
See what you can do. Release human potential for a purpose.

Cheers!
Marci

SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: United Nations recognizes World Creativity and Innovation Day, April 21

Update April 21,2017. 
Great news!! WCIW is gaining momentum. More sponsors want to be included in UN resolution. Delayed reading in General Assembly!
Thank you, everyone, for your leadership, inspiring others to use creativity (generating new ideas, making new decisions, taking new actions and achieving new outcomes) and innovation in their problem-finding and problem-solving to make the world a better place and to make their place in the world better too.
I am thrilled to announce that On April 20, 2017,  10:00 am eastern, I. Rhonda King, Permanent Representative/Ambassador to the United Nations from St. Vincent and the Grenadines is scheduled to read a UN resolution on the floor of the General Assembly to include World Creativity and Innovation Day, April 21, among the UN Days of Observance which includes Earth Day, Water Day, World Humanitarian Day, and the like.
In her 10-minute speech, Ms. King will emphasize the importance of using creativity to meet the 2030 UN Sustainable Development Goals: 17 Goals to Transform the World
Friends, I urge you to do a few things:

  1. Review the UN Sustainable Development Goals, and choose one to creatively champion (even in one small way) with your family, friends, clients and colleagues this year and every year forward; in the coming months we will be collecting your stories so keep a record, and stay tuned!
  2. Gather with others to Watch Permanent Representative I. Rhonda King deliver her speech on Thursday, April 20, 2017, at 10:00 Eastern Time on UNWebTv
  3. Celebrate, celebrate, celebrate! on April 21st; the UN is sanctioning using creativity in problem-solving to transform the world.
  4. List your celebration (it’s free!) here for others to see.

Cool news, eh?
Logos created by Vanessa Chaplin

From the Archives: WCIW FAQ's from 2004

Found this gem from 2004 while going through old files. Could not not share. Thinking you might pick up an idea or two to round out your plans for  World Creativity and Innovation Day, April 21 and/or World Creativity and Innovation Week April 15-21 celebrations.
Looking back, not much has changed conceptually about celebrating creativity and innovation during the week of April 15 – 21 conceptually over the years.  Except …

Logo CID
2004 CID Logo

Twelve years ago not as much was known about creativity and innovation; the terms didn’t easily roll off the tongues of our leaders then, there were far fewer news headlines containing the words.
People use creativity in everyday language now. The words creativity and innovation appear in more corporate mission statements, job descriptions and self-help columns than ever, for example,
2014 WCIW Logo
2014 WCIW Logo

When people ask why during this one week you encourage them to explore and expand their creative potential, tell them this:  the goal is for everyone on the planet (for now) to experience at least one moment of inspired joy during that time frame.  Imagine how that would be, eh?
Into to the FAQ’s
In 2004 WCIW didn’t exist – not yet. We called April 21 Creativity and Innovation Day (CID) and referenced the week leading up to it as idea week, beginning on Leonardo da Vinci’s birthday, April 15th.
Celebrations that year included activities in over 45 countries, One was a workshop day in Toronto called, Admit it. You are Creative! Participants were given small and potent doses (like espresso) of different approaches and experiences in creativity and innovation.
Other celebrations included creativity themed street markets in Bangkok, Thailand, and Zona Norte, Argentina; creativity gatherings in Rio de Janeiro and Slovenia. radio shows in Peru. Leo(nardo da Vinci) Awards were given out in Chicago to local businesses for advanced creative approaches.  The list goes on.
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This first section shows  early positioning thinking for CID.
Why Celebrate CID?
To celebrate human creativity and innovation worldwide
Creativity is generally applied
1 – to make one’s world more beautiful and harmonious
2 – to solve challenges for survival
3 – to express oneself
The capacity to create is inborn.
Business concept
CID provides a service to people to realize their creative contributions – to make new decisions; to replace fear with confidence, and to celebrate making new decisions.  CID can be leveraged to honour risk taking to make the world more sustainable.
What industry does it belong to?
Training, education, entertainment, recreation, technology, information, financial, social clubs, PTA’s; wherever people are.
What products or services does it provide?

  • Experiences of joy, accomplishment, celebration
  • Bolstered confidence in flexible thinking, good feeling, wholeness, amazement

Potential customers
Sponsors who want to identify with creativity and innovation;  teams looking for an outlet for their creativity and freedom from the restrictions of corporate nay-saying; hungry people; activists; educators and students, town councils, government agencies…
Frequently asked questions
Why does Creativity Day have a week’s lead up?  Why is it more than just one day?
Creativity is more than an event.  It’s a process.  The reason the celebrations last for a week is to model this very important concept.
What happens each day of the week leading to Creativity and Innovation Day?
Each day, individuals, teams, organizations, families, schools and communities host an activity to welcome, engage, and contribute pride in creating and innovating.
Who’s behind CID?
Started by Marci Segal, creativity specialist and author, CID is observed and supported by concerned and influential individuals and groups of people all over the world who recognize the need for creative energies and innovation to be celebrated, affirmed and used for creating new desirable futures. (In 2017 WCID, World Creativity and Innovation Day, April 21 was adopted as a United Nations global day of observance).
What is the intent of CID?
Creativity and Innovation Day is intended to serve as a pivot point for individuals, groups, communities and organizations to
• bring creativity and innovation to mind
• recognize creations and innovations
• begin a new cycle for creating
• think new thoughts, generate new ideas, make new decisions, take new action
How can I get involved?
• Sponsor an event in your local community, group, school, or association.
• Identify people who are passionate about releasing creative potential, hold a conference, a show, a fun fair.
• Show off your achievements and accomplishments.
• Have a dinner with friends and toast each others’ creative and innovative achievements and discuss what else is new and on the horizon.
What support is available for CID activities?
Funding is being sought  from local community groups, associations, governments, industry and corporations.  More sponsors are needed.  Can you help?
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Hope you found these helpful.  Maybe  a new thought or two was triggered for you about ways to  celebrate WCIW this year.  And yes, we continue to look for sponsors. Activities and funds are welcome.  Add your activity here and use the donate button on the left to make a contribution that will help make a difference moving forward.
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Join the energy!  Connect, explore, enjoy and urge your colleagues, friends and family to do something different during World Creativity and Innovation Week this and every year.